David BELJONNE

Email: David.Beljonne@umons.ac.be
Phone: 065/37.38.72

Biosketch



David Beljonne got his PhD in Chemistry at the University of Mons-Hainaut in 1994. After post-doctoral stays at the Universities of Cambridge (with Prof. Sir Richard Friend) and Rochester (with Prof. Shaul Mukamel), he went back to Mons where he is now a Research Director of the Belgian National Science Foundation (FNRS). He is also a Visiting Principal Research Scientist at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta (in the group of Prof. Jean-Luc Brédas). Co-author of more than 230 scientific publications, his research activities deal with the modeling using classical and quantum-chemical approaches of the interplay between the supramolecular organization and the opto-electronic properties of conjugated materials, and the implications thereof for applications in organic electronics and photonics.

Five Significant Publications over the last five years

- F.C. Spano, S.C.J. Meskers, E. Hennebicq, and D. Beljonne, “Probing Excitation Delocalization in Supramolecular Chiral Stacks by Means of Circularly Polarized Light: Experiment and Modeling”, Journal of the American Chemical Society, 129, 7044-7054 (2007).
-  Y.S. Huang, S. Westenhoff, I. Avilov, P. Sreearunothai, J.M. Hodgkiss, C. Deleener, R.H. Friend, and D. Beljonne, “Electronic Structures of Interfacial States Formed at Polymeric Semiconductor Heterojunctions”, Nature Materials, 7, 483-489 (2008).
- S. Verlaak, D. Beljonne, D. Cheyns, C. Rolin, M. Linares, F. Castet, J. Cornil, and P. Heremans, “Electronic Structure and Geminate Pair Energetics at Organic–Organic Interfaces:   The Case of Pentacene/C60 Heterojunctions”, Advanced Functional Materials, 19, 3809-3814 (2009).
- D. Beljonne, C. Curutchet, G.D. Scholes, and R.J. Silbey, “Beyond Förster Resonance Energy Transfer in Biological and Nanoscale Systems”, Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 113, 6583-6599 (2009).
- E.V. Emelianova, S. Athanasopoulos, R.J. Silbey, D. Beljonne, “2D excitons as primary energy carriers in organic crystals. The case of oligoacenes”, Physical Review Letters, 104, 206405 (2010).